Pakistani Asylum

If you left Pakistan because of death threats, you may seek asylum in the United States. There are five different grounds for Pakistani to move to the U.S. to find shelter. But arguably the most common grounds are religion and membership in a social group. We are going to discuss the main aspects of getting asylum in the U.S. for Pakistani people.

Pakistani Asylum

Asylum for Pakistani in the United States

Many Pakistanis who converted from Islam to humanism or Christianity are tortured or even sentenced. If you belong to a religious minority in Pakistan such as Shia Muslims, Hindus, or Ahmadis, various sectarian groups may persecute you. What is worse, the Pakistani laws regarding religion are extreme. For blasphemy, a person will be murdered in Pakistan. And although activists urged the Pakistani government to remove the law against religious minorities, the government still has not changed it.

Once you escape Pakistan and enter the United States, you will need to apply for asylum and get ready to the interview with the asylum officer. You will have to persuade an asylum officer that your persecution in Pakistan was imminent, and you had to leave the country.

Most of the asylum interview questions will be about your religion if you claim that you would be persecuted for your beliefs. You should gather important information about your religion such as the religious practices and leaders. Because if your answers are not consistent, the asylum officer may not believe that you are eligible for asylum. To better prepare for an interview, we recommend you to read our article “What applicants for asylum must know about asylum interview.”

With the latest changes to the law made by Trump administration, it becomes increasingly difficult to receive asylum. The U.S. authorities seek for any ways to remove you from the country. And they may even try to deport you immediately after you arrive to the United States.

To increase your chances for receiving asylum, you should consult with an immigration lawyer. An immigration lawyer will help you gather sufficient evidence to convince the U.S. authorities to grant you asylum.